Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive


The Movement is the Message: Meeting People Where They Are and Breaking Through Ideological Barriers

The Movement is the Message: Meeting People Where They Are and Breaking Through Ideological Barriers

Changing minds and hearts on social justice issues is challenging, even during the best of times. And these are not the best of times. Today, Americans are more divided, and less willing to listen to one another, than at any point in the last half century. But there are effective strategies for meeting people where they are to move them closer to justice. And time-tested ways to break through barriers to make sure that your message is heard and acted on.

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Survivors’ Voices: Reimagining Justice for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Survivors’ Voices: Reimagining Justice for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Crimes against people with disabilities are often challenging for professionals who respond to crime victims. Although people with disabilities are 7 times more likely to experience sexual assault than people without disabilities, they often do not have access to victim services. In this session, attendees will explore what justice means to people with disabilities by listening to the voices of survivors. Together, the presenters and attendees will reimagine what trauma-informed best practices should look like for victims with disabilities.

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Overcoming the Criminalization of Human Trafficking Survivors

Overcoming the Criminalization of Human Trafficking Survivors

This panel will discuss the criminalization of human trafficking survivors and the ways advocates and attorneys can support survivors and help them clear their criminal records. The topics discussed will include: the intersection of the criminalization of survivors with racial justice, criminal court advocacy, affirmative defenses, criminal vacatur, changes in the laws nationally, power of vacatur for survivors, and how to build relationships with prosecution and educate the legal system.

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In It for the Long-Haul: Concrete Strategies for Building a Trauma-Informed Workplace

In It for the Long-Haul: Concrete Strategies for Building a Trauma-Informed Workplace

In recent years, there has been a push for organizations to become trauma-informed. While this is a necessary endeavor that many technical assistance providers have pivoted many trainings towards, there is a dearth of information about what it means to build vicarious trauma (VT) awareness into an organization. Trainings provide a wonderful resource for staff and supervisors, however, becoming a trauma-informed workplace must do more to ensure systemic and ongoing efforts to reduce VT in the workplace. Government organizations often have additional barriers that limit how funds and resources are used.

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“Changing the Shape” How an Expert Advisory Workgroup is Shifting the Culture at their Institution

“Changing the Shape” How an Expert Advisory Workgroup is Shifting the Culture at their Institution

In 2018, MSU faced an institutional crisis when over 200 survivors gave victim impact statements at the sentencing hearing of the former MSU physician who had abused them over a 20-year period. 2018 was also a breaking point for many other survivors — hundreds of MSU students, faculty, staff, and alumni came forward to report abuse and harassment they had been afraid to report for years, even decades. The university had created a culture in which survivors were afraid to report, and those who did disclose abuse often felt re-victimized and re-traumatized. In response to this crisis, the Relationship Violence and Sexual Misconduct Expert Advisory Workgroup was formed.

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A Racial Justice Adaptation of SAMHSA’s Trauma-Informed Care Principles

A Racial Justice Adaptation of SAMHSA’s Trauma-Informed Care Principles

Racial justice is a public health and safety issue. The history of systemic racism and structural disempowerment in the United States sets the stage for a multitude of problems in vulnerable populations. In communities of color, health disparities related to bias and persistent institutional mistreatment and trauma are pervasive. For victims of color, who have experienced domestic or sexual violence, these harmful structures can be increasingly disenfranchising and act as barriers to engagement in services, participation in the criminal justice system, and can also lead to negative case outcomes.

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Traditional Law Enforcement Interrogation Methods Versus the Trauma-informed Interview Process

Traditional Law Enforcement Interrogation Methods Versus the Trauma-informed Interview Process

Traditional interview and interrogation methods have been used for years to the detriment of survivors of sexual violence, including the way questions were asked and how a victim’s answers were scrutinized using deception detection techniques. However, over the last several years, progressive law enforcement agencies have come to realize why a trauma-informed response to survivors of sexual assault is a significant improvement. This is especially true in how law enforcement has begun using a trauma-informed interviewing process for survivors. What if we extended these same trauma-informed techniques to victims of other crimes, witnesses, and even suspects?

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The Future of Victim Services- 2021 and Beyond

The Future of Victim Services- 2021 and Beyond

One in five people have been the victim of crime over the past ten years, but less than one in three report receiving help. Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) report receiving help from police in less than 20% of cases, and primarily turn to loved ones, health care providers and community-based services. Recent research confirms the long lasting emotional, physical, and financial struggles crime victims endure long past the crime event.

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A Victim-Centered Approach to Elder Abuse Investigations

A Victim-Centered Approach to Elder Abuse Investigations

One in ten adults over the age of 60 has experienced one or more forms of abuse – physical or sexual assault, neglect, or financial exploitation. However, communities often struggle to identify, respond to, and prevent elder abuse. Ineffective response can result from lack of training for law enforcement, prosecutors, and court staff. It may also be due to lack of coordination across systems and disciplines. Factors such as ageism, family dynamics, fear, isolation, health concerns, and financial constraints can impair an older victim’s ability or willingness to report abuse. Furthermore, in many communities, there is a lack of funding to address elder abuse and provide services to victims.

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Empathy-Based Interrogation (EBI)

Empathy-Based Interrogation (EBI)

Empathy-Based Interrogation (EBI) is an advanced interrogation and interview philosophy designed to keep suspects talking. EBI is research-based and grounded in empathy which facilitates an understanding of the subject’s point of view and motivation for committing the offense. It also provides incentives for the subject to share accurate information. In addition, because it is a non-coercive, conversational interview, it is more easily defended in the courtroom. EBI will benefit anyone who conducts interviews for the purpose of gaining accurate and actionable information.

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