Resource Library

Resource Library

  • Topic

  • Organization

729 resources.

Victim Law

Web Links
Author:

VictimLaw is a searchable database of victims’ rights legal provisions including federal, state, and territorial statutes, Tribal laws, state constitutional amendments, court rules, administrative code provisions, and summaries of related court decisions and attorney general opinions.

Visit link |
Victim Law Position Paper: Crime Victims Have the Right to Retained Counsel’s Presence During Investigative Interviews

Articles or Reports | August 1, 2014
Author:

In this position paper, the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) outlines the basis for their argument that crime victims have the right to retained counsel’s presence during investigative interview. This argument is based on the federal Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA) as well as other constitutional and rule-based rights which make crime victims independent participants, rather than mere witnesses, in the criminal justice system.

View document |
Victim Preference Statement Form

Tools & Templates
Author: Other

View document |
Victim Responses to Sexual Assault: Counterintuitive or Simply Adaptive?

Articles or Reports | January 1, 2007
Author:

View document |
Victim Rights Law Center

Web Links
Author:

Provides civil legal representation to victims of sexual violence, training for attorneys, and advocates nationally and technical assistance.

Visit link |
Victim-Oriented Multi-Disciplinary Responses to Statutory Rape

Tools & Templates | February 1, 2000
Author:

This Training Guide contains practical suggestions to increase the reporting of statutory rapes, to improve investigations and prosecutions of statutory rapes, to improve treatment of statutory rape victims and offenders, and to develop sound sentencing practices to guide judges in statutory rape cases.

View document |
Victims and Witnesses with Developmental Disabilities and the Prosecution of Sexual Assault

Articles or Reports
Author:

This article will provide a brief overview of developmental disabilities and the diagnostic criteria for mental retardation, and will then offer practical tips for prosecutors in cases where the victim in a sexual assault case has a diagnosis of mental retardation.

View document |
Victims with Disabilities: Collaborative, Multidisciplinary First Response

Tools & Templates
Author:

The goal of this training guide is to present this knowledge to professionals who may need to provide first response services to crime victims who have cognitive or communicative disabilities.

View document |
Victims with Disabilities: The Forensic Interview, Trainer’s Guide and Training DVD

Tools & Templates | July 1, 2011
Author:

A trainer’s guide to demonstrate effective techniques for interviewing individuals with disabilities that affect cognitive and communication abilities.

View document |
Victims’ Rights Compel Action to Counteract Judges’ and Juries’ Common Misperceptions About Domestic Violence Victims’ Behavior

Articles or Reports | September 1, 2014
Author:

This Bulletin identifies many of the most common domestic violence myths, provides evidence to debunk these myths, and explains that victims’ rights compel the submission of explanatory information to educate judges and juries about the reasons victims engage in what otherwise might be perceived as “counterintuitive” behaviors.

View document |
Victims’ Rights Request Form For Adult Cases

Tools & Templates | February 1, 2013
Author: Other

View document |
VINE Resource Center

Web Links
Author: Other

A YouTube channel hosted by Appriss Insights featuring videos, including tutorials about the VINELink mobile app.

Visit link |
Violación Sexual y El Cerebro

Articles or Reports
Author: Other

¿Por qué muchas víctimas de violación sexual no gritan ni se defienden?

¿Por qué los recuerdos de violación sexual son tan a menudo fragmentados y confusos?

¿Es la respuesta del cerebro a un ataque esencialmente la misma, controlada por los circuitos del miedo, funcionando por reflejos y hábitos – durante una violación sexual, agresión física y combate militar?

¿Cuáles son las implicaciones de las respuestas a estas preguntas – para personas que han sido violadas sexualmente, para quienes investigan y acusan esos delitos y para todos los que encuentran o conocen a alguien que ha sido violado sexualmente?

Estas son las preguntas que paso mucho tiempo respondiendo estos días como consultor y capacitador.

Aquí doy respuestas, con enlaces a mis artículos publicados originalmente en el medio popular.

Visit link |
Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

Articles or Reports | June 1, 2016
Author:

Study showing that American Indian and Alaska Native women and men suffer violence at alarmingly high rates.

Visit link |
Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005

Articles or Reports | January 5, 2006
Author: Other

View document |
Violence in the Lives of the Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Web Links | April 1, 2014
Author:

This Special Collection offers information regarding the experiences and needs of individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing and have experienced abuse. The purpose of this collection is to: 1) increase victim advocates’ knowledge and understanding of Deaf culture, 2) provide resources to assist helping professionals in direct service work with Deaf individuals, and 3) highlight best practices for addressing domestic and sexual violence in the Deaf community.

Visit link |
Virginia – Frequently Asked Questions: Physical Evidence Collection Kit (PERK) Authorization and Payment

Protocols | August 22, 2008
Author: Other

Amendments to the Code of Virginia (See §§ 19.2-165.1, 19.2-368.3, and 19.2-368.11:1) effective July 1, 2008, make significant changes to laws describing the provision of, and payment for, forensic examinations in sexual assault cases. These changes bring Virginia into compliance with federal law. This document is intended to address some of the most frequently asked questions regarding the statutory changes and their implementation.

View document |
Virginia’s Healthcare Response to Sexual Assault: Guidelines for the Acute Care of Adult and Post Pubertal Adolescent Sexual Assault Patients

Protocols | November 2, 2009
Author: Other

This document provides guidance for compassionate and effective care for adult and post-pubertal adolescent sexual assault patients. It does not represent the only medically or legally acceptable response to any sexual assault patient or establish a legal or medical standard of care, and deviation from this document does not necessarily represent a breach of a standard of care. The ultimate judgment regarding a healthcare provider’s recommendation on a course of action for a patient must be made by the clinician in light of all the circumstances presented.

View document |
Voices & Faces Project

Web Links
Author:

A national network of survivors willing to stand up and speak out about sexual violence.

Visit link |
Walking A Tightrope: Balancing Victim Privacy and Offender Accountability in Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prosecutions – Part 1

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2013
Author:

This Strategies article is Part I of a two-part series addressing two types of victim privacy laws – confidentiality and privilege. Part I provides an overview of confidentiality laws in order to assist prosecutors in effectively balancing offender accountability with the safety needs and expectations of victims during criminal investigations and prosecutions.

View document |
Walking A Tightrope: Balancing Victim Privacy and Offender Accountability in Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prosecutions – Part 2

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2013
Author:

Part II provides prosecutors with a greater understanding of legal privileges that exist in the following relationships: qualified community advocate/client, clergy/penitent, psychiatrist/patient, physician/patient, spousal, and attorney/client. This Strategies issue will also include common scenarios in which these privileges may be challenged and suggest strategies for prosecutors to protect privileged communications where the victim’s privacy interests outweigh the need for the sought information.

View document |
What Happened with the Sexual Assault Reports? Then Vs. Now

Articles or Reports | September 1, 2016
Author: Other

This report provides data describing how sexual assault reports that were not previously indicted were initially processed through the system from the Reporting Phase, to the Investigative Phase, and the Prosecution Phase. We then track what is currently happening with these cases as part of the Cuyahoga County Sexual Assault Kit (SAK) Pilot Research Project.

View document |
When and Why We See Victims as Responsible: The Impact of Ideology on Attitudes Toward Victims

Articles or Reports | January 1, 2016
Author: Other

Why do victims sometimes receive sympathy for their suffering and at other times scorn and blame? Here we show a powerful role for moral values in attitudes toward victims. We measured moral values associated with unconditionally prohibiting harm (“individualizing values”) versus moral values associated with prohibiting behavior that destabilizes groups and relationships (“binding values”: loyalty, obedience to authority, and purity). Increased endorsement of binding values predicted increased ratings of victims as contaminated (Studies 1-4); increased blame and responsibility attributed to victims, increased perceptions of victims’ (versus perpetrators’) behaviors as contributing to the outcome, and decreased focus on perpetrators (Studies 2-3). Patterns persisted controlling for politics, just world beliefs, and right-wing authoritarianism. Experimentally manipulating linguistic focus off of victims and onto perpetrators reduced victim blame. Both binding values and focus modulated victim blame through victim responsibility attributions. Findings indicate the important role of ideology in attitudes toward victims via effects on responsibility attribution.

View document |
When to Conduct an Exam or Interview

Training Bulletins | June 1, 2013
Author:

This training bulletin was written to respond to the question of whether victims should be allowed to sleep before conducting a medical forensic examination or detailed law enforcement interview. Several concrete suggestions are offered to help meet the needs of victims when they are intoxicated and/or want to sleep.

View document |
Who Pays for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Exams? It Is Not the Victim’s Responsibility?

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2014
Author: Other

The Urban Institute, George Mason University, and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center collaborated to learn about the payment policies and practices that have been set up to address this requirement.

View document |
Why Many Rape Victims Don’t Fight or Yell

Articles or Reports | June 23, 2015
Author: Other

Published in June 2015, this brief essay explains basic brain responses to being attacked, including sexually. It also has links to key scientific review articles on the brain bases and evolutionary origins of commonly misunderstood effects of the fear circuitry taking over: impairment of the prefrontal cortex, survival reflexes (e.g., freezing, tonic immobility) and ineffective habit behaviors.

View document |
Why Rape and Trauma Survivors Have Fragmented and Incomplete Memories

Articles or Reports | December 9, 2014
Author: Other

This brief essay, written with David Lisak, explains how fear and trauma, including in the midst of a sexual assault, shape how memories are encoded, and thus how we should expect the memories to be later, when the victim is trying to recall what happened with investigators, school administrators, family and friends. Understanding these basics can be very helpful to everyone involved, including by decreasing victims’ shame and self-doubt about fragmentary and incomplete memories.

View document |