Resource Library

Resource Library

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628 resources.

Victim Rights Law Center

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Provides civil legal representation to victims of sexual violence, training for attorneys, and advocates nationally and technical assistance.

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Victims and Witnesses with Developmental Disabilities and the Prosecution of Sexual Assault

Articles or Reports
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This article will provide a brief overview of developmental disabilities and the diagnostic criteria for mental retardation, and will then offer practical tips for prosecutors in cases where the victim in a sexual assault case has a diagnosis of mental retardation.

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Victims’ Rights Compel Action to Counteract Judges’ and Juries’ Common Misperceptions About Domestic Violence Victims’ Behavior

Articles or Reports | September 1, 2014
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This Bulletin identifies many of the most common domestic violence myths, provides evidence to debunk these myths, and explains that victim’s rights compel the submission of explanatory information to educate judges and juries about the reasons victims engage in what otherwise might be perceived as “counterintuitive” behaviors.

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Victims’ Rights Request Form For Adult Cases

Tools & Templates | February 1, 2013
Author: Other

The form can be completed by crime victims in the state of Oregon, to request specific rights they would like honored, and it is then given to the local district attorney’s office. The form also provides victims with information about any time limits for requesting particular rights, as required by law

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VINE Resource Center

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Author: Other

A YouTube channel hosted by Appriss Insights featuring videos, including tutorials about the VINELink mobile app.

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Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

Articles or Reports | June 1, 2016
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Study showing that American Indian and Alaska Native women and men suffer violence at alarmingly high rates.

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Violence Against Women and the Role of Religion

Articles or Reports

This article analyzes how three major world religions – Christianity, Judaism, and Islam – present both roadblocks and resources for female victims of sexual and domestic violence.

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Violence in the Lives of the Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Web Links | April 1, 2014
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This Special Collection offers information regarding the experiences and needs of individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing and have experienced abuse. The purpose of this collection is to: 1) increase victim advocates’ knowledge and understanding of Deaf culture, 2) provide resources to assist helping professionals in direct service work with Deaf individuals, and 3) highlight best practices for addressing domestic and sexual violence in the Deaf community.

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Virginia’s Healthcare Response to Sexual Assault: Guidelines for the Acute Care of Adult and Post Pubertal Adolescent Sexual Assault Patients

Protocols | November 2, 2009
Author: Other

This document provides guidance for compassionate and effective care for adult and post-pubertal adolescent sexual assault patients. It does not represent the only medically or legally acceptable response to any sexual assault patient or establish a legal or medical standard of care, and deviation from this document does not necessarily represent a breach of a standard of care. The ultimate judgment regarding a healthcare provider’s recommendation on a course of action for a patient must be made by the clinician in light of all the circumstances presented.

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Voices & Faces Project

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A national network of survivors willing to stand up and speak out about sexual violence.

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Voices of Healing: Trans & Nonbinary Survivors SPEAK OUT

Webinars | May 15, 2022
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Four trans and nonbinary survivors of sexual abuse/assault share their stories of resilience and healing. This is a recording of the Live Premiere event on April 10, 2022.

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Walking A Tightrope: Balancing Victim Privacy and Offender Accountability in Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prosecutions – Part 1

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2013
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This Strategies article is Part I of a two-part series addressing two types of victim privacy laws – confidentiality and privilege. Part I provides an overview of confidentiality laws in order to assist prosecutors in effectively balancing offender accountability with the safety needs and expectations of victims during criminal investigations and prosecutions.

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Walking A Tightrope: Balancing Victim Privacy and Offender Accountability in Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prosecutions – Part 2

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2013
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Part II provides prosecutors with a greater understanding of legal privileges that exist in the following relationships: qualified community advocate/client, clergy/penitent, psychiatrist/patient, physician/patient, spousal, and attorney/client. This Strategies issue will also include common scenarios in which these privileges may be challenged and suggest strategies for prosecutors to protect privileged communications where the victim’s privacy interests outweigh the need for the sought information.

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We’ve Been Put Through Fire & Come Out Divine: Stories of Hope & Survival

Books | January 12, 2024
Author: Other

We’ve Been Put Through Fire and Come Out Divine: Stories of Hope & Survival is a raw and powerful anthology that documents the harrowing experiences of survivors of sexual violence and abuse. The collection explores the loss of identity, agency, and voice that often accompanies trauma, painting a stark picture of its damaging effects.

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What Do Sexual Assault Cases Look Like in Our Community? A SART Coordinator’s Guidebook for Case File Review

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This toolkit is a step-by-step guide that leads SART Coordinators through the Sexual Violence Justice Institute (SVJI) process of reviewing law enforcement case files. In this toolkit, you will find an effective process for identifying areas where your SART is successful in its response to victims and areas where your SART can improve. Each of the core agencies (Law Enforcement, Medical, Prosecution, Advocacy, and Probation) will learn specific information about their response that can be further developed or sustained for an optimum response to victims.

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What Happened with the Sexual Assault Reports? Then Vs. Now

Articles or Reports | September 1, 2016
Author: Other

This report provides data describing how sexual assault reports that were not previously indicted were initially processed through the system from the Reporting Phase, to the Investigative Phase, and the Prosecution Phase. We then track what is currently happening with these cases as part of the Cuyahoga County Sexual Assault Kit (SAK) Pilot Research Project.

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What Religious Leaders Can do to Respond to Sexual and Domestic Violence

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This resource provides 15 concrete suggestions on how faith leaders can respond to domestic and sexual violence.

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When I Call for Help: A Pastoral Response to Domestic Violence Against Women

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This statement from the Catholic Church provides information on domestic violence and the Church’s Response.

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When to Conduct an Exam or Interview

Training Bulletins | June 1, 2013
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This training bulletin was written to respond to the question of whether victims should be allowed to sleep before conducting a medical forensic examination or detailed law enforcement interview. Several concrete suggestions are offered to help meet the needs of victims when they are intoxicated and/or want to sleep.

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Who Pays for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Exams? It Is Not the Victim’s Responsibility

Articles or Reports | May 1, 2014
Author: Other

The Urban Institute, George Mason University, and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center collaborated to learn about the payment policies and practices that have been set up to address the requirement for jurisdictions to provide medical forensic exams for sexual assault victims (1) free of charge and (2) regardless of whether they decide to report to law enforcement or participate in the criminal justice process.

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Why Many Rape Victims Don’t Fight or Yell

Articles or Reports | June 23, 2015
Author: Other

Published in June 2015, this brief essay explains basic brain responses to being attacked, including sexually. It also has links to key scientific review articles on the brain bases and evolutionary origins of commonly misunderstood effects of the fear circuitry taking over: impairment of the prefrontal cortex, survival reflexes (e.g., freezing, tonic immobility) and ineffective habit behaviors.

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Why Rape and Trauma Survivors Have Fragmented and Incomplete Memories

Articles or Reports | December 9, 2014
Author: Other

This brief essay explains how fear and trauma, including in the midst of a sexual assault, shape how memories are encoded, and thus how we should expect the memories to be later, when the victim is trying to recall what happened with investigators, school administrators, family, and friends. Understanding these basics can be very helpful to everyone involved, including by decreasing victims’ shame and self-doubt about fragmentary and incomplete memories.

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Why Test Rape Kits After the Statute of Limitations has Expired? A Victim-Centric Approach

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Testing all sexual assault kits, regardless of the ability to prosecute, will increase law enforcement’s ability to respond to victims, prevent future victimizations, and bring justice to victims.

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Williams v. Illinois and Forensic Evidence: The Bleeding Edge of Crawford

Articles or Reports | June 1, 2013
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The application of Crawford principles in the context of forensic evidence continues to plague the criminal justice system. The United States Supreme Court’s decision in Williams v. Illinois raises more questions than it answers about when and how an expert may testify to conclusions based upon the opinions or work of other (non-testifying) experts or technicians. This article reviews the relevant case law, and explores how trial prosecutors can present a case involving forensic testing conducted by a multitude of technicians and experts. It also addresses Williams’ impact on cold cases, in which original experts who performed autopsies and other forensic examinations and testing are no longer available for trial.

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Women of Color Network: Domestic Violence (Facts and Stats Collection)

Articles or Reports | June 1, 2006
Author: Other

Domestic Violence (DV) occurs among all race/ethnicities and socio-economic classes. DV is a pattern of many behaviors directed at achieving and maintaining power and control over an intimate partner, such as physical violence, emotional abuse, isolation of the victim, economic abuse, intimidation, coercion, and threats. For women of color, high rates of poverty, poor education, limited job resources, language barriers, and fear of deportation increase their difficulty finding help and support services.

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Working with Older Survivors of Abuse: A Framework for Advocates

Tools & Templates
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This summary report begins with a brief overview of elder abuse and abuse in later life. Subsequent sections describe seven key guiding principles as well as minimum guidelines and practice strategies for advocates to consider in their work with older survivors.

In addition to written content, this document also includes supplemental video resources.

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Your Voice, Your Choice: A Survivor Media Guide

Tools & Templates | February 1, 2015
Author: Other

A desire to speak out is important, but preparation is key. Survivors of rape and abuse can talk about the issue of gender-related violence with unique authority. And for many who have lived through such violence, the act of sharing their stories can be transformative, and even healing. And yet. Speaking publicly about an issue that the world is still largely unwilling to confront can be a harrowing and even retraumatizing experience. At CounterQuo, we believe that the best way to embark on a media journey that you will not regret is to think through the challenges you may encounter before you come forward. That’s what “Your Voice, Your Choice” is all about.

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