Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive

Sneak Preview of the New and Improved SAFE Virtual Practicum

Sneak Preview of the New and Improved SAFE Virtual Practicum

In October 2019, OVW awarded EVAWI a grant, in partnership with NIJ, to update the Virtual Practicum to ensure that it incorporates advances in science, technology, and best practice recommendations. EVAWI and members of the original Dartmouth team that created the Virtual Practicum have collaborated with the AFN, IAFN and an Expert Practitioner Panel to re-master the Virtual Practicum. Presenters will describe the process for creating the revised Virtual Practicum and highlight new content, including how it has been updated to reflect the current National Protocol for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examinations.

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Cops are from Mars, Advocates are from Venus

Cops are from Mars, Advocates are from Venus

This workshop will be taught by an advocate and a law enforcement professional who believe we are far more effective when we serve our communities together rather than separately in our own silos. Presenters and attendees alike will be challenged to examine their own biases of their fellow public servants so that we know where improvements can be made. Attendees of this workshop will be given real world examples of collaborative approaches from victim advocates and law enforcement, and be shown how to work more cohesively to achieve that success.

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Bringing Sexual Violence Trauma-Informed Services Behind Bars: Getting a PREA Program off the Ground

Bringing Sexual Violence Trauma-Informed Services Behind Bars: Getting a PREA Program off the Ground

In this workshop, using HAWC’s efforts to develop and sustain the expanded PREA programming in the greater Houston area, participants will learn about the critical need for and potential ways to create a PREA program, as well as best practices for working collaboratively with detention facility administration and staff. Because this programming connects to long-term social justice goals, the workshop also will include information about supporting survivors upon reentry. Participants also will have the opportunity to view the HAWC-Harris County Sheriff’s Office short film, Your Rights As An Inmate: Responding to and Reporting Sexual Abuse and Sexual Harassment. This collaboratively written and produced film is a powerful example of resource advocacy. The film features HAWC and Harris County Jail staff, as well as testimony from incarcerated survivors.

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Using Technology to Identify Sexual Abuse in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

Using Technology to Identify Sexual Abuse in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

New information technologies, such as the Right Care Now Project, detect patterns of abuse from information about a person’s function and health regularly entered into the system by caregivers. This system creates notifications to DSPs, providers, and administrators recommending an investigation for sexual abuse.

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It’s Not About Us: Collaborative Prosecution of Sexual Assault Cases

It’s Not About Us: Collaborative Prosecution of Sexual Assault Cases

Law enforcement, prosecutors, and advocates have different roles in the criminal justice system. This means we may not always agree. Yet the reality is that we share a common goal: protection of the victim and the community. Sexual assault cases are different than any other type of crime and because of this, it is crucial that we as law enforcement, prosecutors, and advocates realize that these cases are not about us at all. We may have different roles, but we all have the same goal. People commonly talk about law enforcement and prosecution “collaborating” on a case together, but what does that really mean in a practical sense? How does collaboration work when you have to be cognizant of the very different roles a law enforcement officer and prosecutor play in the justice system? How do you overcome the difference between probable cause and proof beyond a reasonable doubt? Who makes sure the victim is included and understands how the process and system work when trying to maintain neutrality in a fair and balanced investigation?

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Multidisciplinary Discussions: Trauma, Resiliency, & Reflections on 10 years of Start by Believing

Multidisciplinary Discussions: Trauma, Resiliency, & Reflections on 10 years of Start by Believing

In this webinar discussions on experiences of trauma, stress, and resiliency will take place through the lens of law enforcement, advocates, and forensic nurses. Panelists will share their experiences in both the professional and personal context discussing sources of stress, the meaning of resiliency and hope, and strategies to address stress. Although pre-recorded, this session will have interactive components. Come join us to learn more about stress and what you can do to prevent, mitigate and manage it.

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Development and Implementation of Domestic Violence High Risk Teams in Rural Communities

Development and Implementation of Domestic Violence High Risk Teams in Rural Communities

When evaluating domestic violence lethality, research demonstrates that location matters. For example, rural women endure more severe violence and experience a higher risk of lethality. Delayed law enforcement response times, coupled with greater distances to life-saving medical intervention, increases the risk of fatality. Domestic Violence High Risk Teams are essential in rural areas as a result, yet few communities have them in place. This session will help organizations determine which partners to include in their high-risk team, as well as how to overcome the various challenges of collaboration. The presenters will review the strategies they have implement to successfully to domestic violence cases in rural communities.

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Acknowledging Law Enforcement Trauma to Help Sexual Assault Survivors: A Tool Kit for Implementation

Acknowledging Law Enforcement Trauma to Help Sexual Assault Survivors: A Tool Kit for Implementation

The City of Cambridge’s Police Department and Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative, in close collaboration with local service providers, have created and implemented a Trauma Informed Law Enforcement (TILE) Initiative, including a model 3 day training, and changes to practice and protocol. The framework for the TILE Initiative includes centering the impacts of trauma on law enforcement personnel as well as the traumatic experiences of community members, particularly sexual assault survivors. This session will provide participants with a basic understanding of the key components of the TILE Initiative and delve deeper into the strategies for integrating these into law enforcement agencies. The session will use experiential learning to illustrate the concepts of trauma informed law enforcement. We will also highlight our recently published new resource that is intended to provide guidance to help police departments and municipalities all over the country design and implement their own trauma-informed training and education program.

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Saving Our Girls: Being Young, Missing, and Black and the Prevalence of Sex Trafficking

Saving Our Girls: Being Young, Missing, and Black and the Prevalence of Sex Trafficking

The story of missing Black girls in Washington, DC in 2017 played a pivotal role in national news coverage about missing teens and, while officials tried to explain the numerous cases of those who went missing, far too many of them remain unresolved. The Black and Missing Foundation indicates that nearly 40 percent of all missing people in the country are people of color. Yet, today, the missing girls in DC receive little attention. Moreover, most of these girls come from marginalized, under-resourced communities and are primarily low-income, which in Washington DC, a city of haves and have-nots, exposes a part of the capital the rest of America may rarely see. A deeper, more nuanced problem, that includes at-risk Black girls, whose lives and struggles sometimes involve sex trafficking, that is often ignored.

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“It’s Not That Complicated” – Building Relationships with LGBTQ+ Communities to Help End Gender Bias

“It’s Not That Complicated” – Building Relationships with LGBTQ+ Communities to Help End Gender Bias

This session will provide law enforcement and victim service providers with an opportunity to explore information about the LGBTQ+ communities they serve, provide techniques to improve and enhance their response to this diverse community, and examine ways in which developing a respectful engagement with this community can assist agencies in the overall goal of reducing gender bias in policing. Officers will be challenged to open up to new thinking, new insights, and new ways of doing police work, which includes an understanding on how past practices damaged relations with this community. Participants will receive a compendium of tools and resources adopted by various departments and victim advocates from across the country which have encouraged a healthy, strong relationship between law enforcement and the LGBTQ+ communities they serve.

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