Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive


Getting to “Guilty”: Guiding the Jury’s Response to the Evidence

Getting to “Guilty”: Guiding the Jury’s Response to the Evidence

This presentation will suggest ways to focus the jury’s attention on the evidence in a manner that accurately conveys the reality of sexual assault and assists jurors in rendering a fair and just verdict – beginning with jury selection and continuing through opening statement, presentation of evidence, and summation.

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Building a Foundation of Police-Community Reconciliation to Address Intimate Partner Violence

Building a Foundation of Police-Community Reconciliation to Address Intimate Partner Violence

This workshop outlines the NNSC’s approach to address the crisis of trust between survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) and law enforcement. Mistrust jeopardizes safety, with less than half of survivors willing to report victimization to law enforcement, and those who do, often find themselves disillusioned with the criminal justice process. The NNSC’s framework of reconciliation, drawing from several international examples including post-Apartheid South Africa and Northern Ireland, presents a unique opportunity to build police-community trust. Piloted since 2015 in six cities across the country though a USDOJ grant, reconciliation centers on an Acknowledgement of Harm, the elevation of impacted community voices through listening sessions with law enforcement, and the incorporation of those insights into a robust policy review process. In select jurisdictions, this framework has been applied specifically to IPV, resulting in substantive policy changes drawn directly from survivor feedback. This workshop will present the framework itself, examples of its use and impact, and new reconciliation opportunities for interdisciplinary partners addressing IPV in their communities.

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Chelsea’s Story

Chelsea’s Story

EVAWI’s Start by Believing campaign has impacted thousands of professionals in their work to respond effectively to sexual violence. In this session, Chelsea Young, a survivor of sexual assault at a small Virginia college, and Dwight Rudd, a Virginia Attorney, share how this campaign directly altered the criminal justice response to her case for the better. Chelsea will share how originally the system failed to believe her or hold her accuser accountable. This finally changed when her case ended up on a prosecutor’s desk just days after his return from a Virginia training program dedicated to improving the response of prosecutors and law enforcement to non-stranger, adult sexual assault cases. After many professionals had failed her, finally, someone within the system started from a place of belief, walked with Chelsea through the process and successfully prosecuted Chelsea’s rapist. This session is a realistic look at how the criminal justice system’s response can drastically alter the outcome of a sexual assault case, if we will just start by believing.

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When Helping Them is Hurting You

When Helping Them is Hurting You

High levels of stress have become the accepted norm in working with victims of trauma, and the effects of that stress run the risk of being ignored. Identifying physical stress triggers in the workplace is essential to building resilience. The more empathic a service provider is, the greater the risk. Ineffective supervision, large caseloads, lack of recovery time between client contacts, traumatized or complex clients, lack of team approach in the workplace, and a lack of supports to meet client/patient needs are other risk factors. A focus on prevention avoids more serious problems later. Like risk factors, there are protective factors inherent in the person and protective factors inherent in the organization. An individual approach is needed to protect service providers against vicarious trauma. Protective factors, like risk factors, are unique to the individual along with their specific personality, characteristics, and experiential background.

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An Electronic Life – How to Destroy a Life through Sextortion

An Electronic Life – How to Destroy a Life through Sextortion

This workshop will address the case of State of Connecticut v. Christopher Lamb, and how a single person can devastate numerous lives through a few keystrokes. In this case, the defendant hacked into and took over the cloud storage and social media accounts of over 20 teenage victims, through exploiting his friendship with the victims and simple social engineering. After taking over their accounts, the defendant downloaded all their personal information, including naked pictures and contacts, and subsequently engaged in “sextortion” by threatening to release these intimate pictures of them to all their contacts if they did not provide him with additional naked pictures. Ultimately, the defendant sent these pictures to all their contacts (including schools and employers), as well as posted them on various “slut-shaming” websites. Recorded post-conviction interviews give a unique insight into the thought process and methodical social engineering process utilized by the offender, as well as the motive behind his actions. Information and studies related to the growing criminal threat of “sextortion,” as well as recommendations regarding law enforcement investigations, charging and plea-negotiation considerations and addressing multiple victims’ needs will be presented.

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Tell Your Truth: The Crossroads of Trauma Informed Education and the Criminal Justice System

Tell Your Truth: The Crossroads of Trauma Informed Education and the Criminal Justice System

Girls in the Juvenile Justice system are disproportionately victims of sexual violence. Girl’s common, age-appropriate reactions to trauma are criminalized and exacerbated by the involvement in the juvenile justice system. In addition, the mental health diagnoses for our justice engaged girls is at 80% while boys are at 67%. This workshop is intended to allow collaborators access points in understanding the gender differences within the ACE criteria points and the problems within the juvenile justice and adult institutions regarding the disproportionate number of girls and women of color within the facilities nationwide. And finally, this workshop will examine a solutions-based approach to changing the system for women and girls. Here in this collaborative workshop, participants will learn the importance of adding or blending Social Emotional Learning into Schools and workplace. They will gain insight on how to run Respect Labs collaboratively with multi-disciplinary institutions. Participants will learn how to identify invisible barriers for justice engaged women and girls.

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My Story Behind the Story

My Story Behind the Story

At 23, Barreras set out on a path to help other survivors of abuse. He became a Special Agent with Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID), specializing in domestic violence, child abuse and sexual assault investigations. Later he stumbled onto another path, catapulting him into victim advocacy where he served as a Victim Advocate for the Air Force, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator for the Coast Guard Barreras’ personal and professional experiences also led him to create Difference Makers (10 Strong), a speaker’s bureau of 10 survivors who work to engage military and civilian communities around the globe.

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Bringing Cosby to Justice: Part 2 – An Investigator’s Guide to the Cosby Prosecution

Bringing Cosby to Justice: Part 2 – An Investigator’s Guide to the Cosby Prosecution

This workshop will follow the plenary session on the Cosby prosecution. The workshop is built for investigators and practitioners and will concentrate on the most significant investigative aspects of the case. The prosecution spanned more than three years from the re-opening of the investigation to sentencing. During those three years, there were two trials, scores of motions and hearings, nearly two dozen criminal defense attorneys, and a variety of unique issues related to the presentation of evidence. The audience will walk through the most impactful aspects of the case including the reopening of the investigation, calling multiple prior victims to testify, the use of experts to dismiss and contextualize common rape myths (especially involving known offenders), the challenges of trying the case twice under an international microscope, and the critical value of having the same detective involved from the first investigation in 2005 all the way through conviction in 2018.

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From #MeToo to #RealChange: Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault

From #MeToo to #RealChange: Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault

This workshop will highlight promising international practices, resources, and accountability systems to enhance law enforcement responses to violence against women and LGBTQI individuals. It will review guidance from the US Department of Justice (DOJ) on Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. The guidance, developed in collaboration with law enforcement leaders, offers trauma-informed and victim-centered approaches in policing practices. The workshop will draw on recommendations and data gathered from climate surveys and community discussions with survivors, advocates and law enforcement in Canada, Brazil, and the United States, as part of the COURAGE in Policing Project, an innovative approach to community-based policing in the domestic violence and sexual assault arena.

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Procedural Justice: Leveling the Playing Field for Victims of Crime

Procedural Justice: Leveling the Playing Field for Victims of Crime

The court system contains challenges that victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, elder or child abuse experience when navigating the court process. Due process requires that those coming before the court system have notice and an opportunity to be heard. However, certain victims may experience barriers to accessing justice. Challenges such as disabilities, language, age, income, geography, or even the implicit bias of court professionals can make justice inaccessible and undermine the integrity of our court system. How do victims’ advocates and other justice professionals safeguard our highest value of justice for all? What kind of collaborations are most effective in ensuring due process for victims? Meeting victims needs in court requires a collaborative, multifaceted approach. This includes an understanding of civil and criminal procedures, knowledge of the court system, accommodations that can overcome physical, cultural, emotional and other barriers. This workshop will provide strategies that will enable multidisciplinary collaboration teams to make justice accessible to all victims.

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