Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive

Stalking in the Digital Age: How to Prevent Victimization

Stalking in the Digital Age: How to Prevent Victimization

Abuse doesn’t always come in the form of physical threats or violence. Online behavior is also abusive if it makes you feel scared or threatens your safety. In a world where we’re always connected, the potential for cyberbullying and digital stalking is more prevalent than ever. Over 200 apps and services exist that offer would-be stalkers a variety of capabilities, from location tracking, to harvesting text messages– and even secretly recording video. Education surrounding these evolving technologies is greatly needed to prevent victimization in the Digital Age.

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Case Closed

Case Closed

“Case Closed,” a six-part series published in the (Cleveland) Plain Dealer chronicled what Fedor did next – she tracked down the man on her own, learning along the way that he was a serial rapist who raped a young woman in the same dingy basement she had escaped from months after she made her report. Fedor pushed through guilt, and shame that she had relapsed after more than a decade of sobriety, and the indifference of a chronically under-resourced sex crimes unit that passed her case from one busy, burned-out detective to the next.

The discussion will include reflections from Sandi and her therapist, who supported her through the process.

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Tell Your Truth: The Crossroads of Trauma Informed Education and the Criminal Justice System

Tell Your Truth: The Crossroads of Trauma Informed Education and the Criminal Justice System

Girls in the Juvenile Justice system are disproportionately victims of sexual violence. Girl’s common, age-appropriate reactions to trauma are criminalized and exacerbated by the involvement in the juvenile justice system. In addition, the mental health diagnoses for our justice engaged girls is at 80% while boys are at 67%. This workshop is intended to allow collaborators access points in understanding the gender differences within the ACE criteria points and the problems within the juvenile justice and adult institutions regarding the disproportionate number of girls and women of color within the facilities nationwide. And finally, this workshop will examine a solutions-based approach to changing the system for women and girls. Here in this collaborative workshop, participants will learn the importance of adding or blending Social Emotional Learning into Schools and workplace. They will gain insight on how to run Respect Labs collaboratively with multi-disciplinary institutions. Participants will learn how to identify invisible barriers for justice engaged women and girls.

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My Story Behind the Story

My Story Behind the Story

At 23, Barreras set out on a path to help other survivors of abuse. He became a Special Agent with Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID), specializing in domestic violence, child abuse and sexual assault investigations. Later he stumbled onto another path, catapulting him into victim advocacy where he served as a Victim Advocate for the Air Force, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator for the Coast Guard Barreras’ personal and professional experiences also led him to create Difference Makers (10 Strong), a speaker’s bureau of 10 survivors who work to engage military and civilian communities around the globe.

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Bringing Cosby to Justice: Part 2 – An Investigator’s Guide to the Cosby Prosecution

Bringing Cosby to Justice: Part 2 – An Investigator’s Guide to the Cosby Prosecution

This workshop will follow the plenary session on the Cosby prosecution. The workshop is built for investigators and practitioners and will concentrate on the most significant investigative aspects of the case. The prosecution spanned more than three years from the re-opening of the investigation to sentencing. During those three years, there were two trials, scores of motions and hearings, nearly two dozen criminal defense attorneys, and a variety of unique issues related to the presentation of evidence. The audience will walk through the most impactful aspects of the case including the reopening of the investigation, calling multiple prior victims to testify, the use of experts to dismiss and contextualize common rape myths (especially involving known offenders), the challenges of trying the case twice under an international microscope, and the critical value of having the same detective involved from the first investigation in 2005 all the way through conviction in 2018.

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From #MeToo to #RealChange: Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault

From #MeToo to #RealChange: Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault

This workshop will highlight promising international practices, resources, and accountability systems to enhance law enforcement responses to violence against women and LGBTQI individuals. It will review guidance from the US Department of Justice (DOJ) on Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. The guidance, developed in collaboration with law enforcement leaders, offers trauma-informed and victim-centered approaches in policing practices. The workshop will draw on recommendations and data gathered from climate surveys and community discussions with survivors, advocates and law enforcement in Canada, Brazil, and the United States, as part of the COURAGE in Policing Project, an innovative approach to community-based policing in the domestic violence and sexual assault arena.

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Procedural Justice: Leveling the Playing Field for Victims of Crime

Procedural Justice: Leveling the Playing Field for Victims of Crime

The court system contains challenges that victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, elder or child abuse experience when navigating the court process. Due process requires that those coming before the court system have notice and an opportunity to be heard. However, certain victims may experience barriers to accessing justice. Challenges such as disabilities, language, age, income, geography, or even the implicit bias of court professionals can make justice inaccessible and undermine the integrity of our court system. How do victims’ advocates and other justice professionals safeguard our highest value of justice for all? What kind of collaborations are most effective in ensuring due process for victims? Meeting victims needs in court requires a collaborative, multifaceted approach. This includes an understanding of civil and criminal procedures, knowledge of the court system, accommodations that can overcome physical, cultural, emotional and other barriers. This workshop will provide strategies that will enable multidisciplinary collaboration teams to make justice accessible to all victims.

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Before It’s Too Late: Identifying Behaviors of Concern When Responding to Domestic Violence

Before It’s Too Late: Identifying Behaviors of Concern When Responding to Domestic Violence

Most mass homicides, a majority of which occur at home or have an intimate partner target, are over in mere minutes. The concept of responding to active shooter events cannot be how we solely address violence – because by then it is too late. This presentation will change the discussion surrounding how to respond to intimate partner and family violence to how to work together as a team to identify behaviors of concern and intervene before violence occurs or repeats. Attendees will learn how to understand and apply direct threat assessment and management concepts and practices to increase intimate victim safety through a multidisciplinary format. We will discuss what the entire idea and concept of “threat assessment” actually means which is “violence prevention” and show attendees how to apply it through recognizing pre-incident indicators and how to respond using intervention options. Attendees will be able to identify the important components between law enforcement, advocacy, mental health staff, attorneys, and others to begin conducting actual threat assessments to recognize and manage those at risk of committing targeted violence. We will discuss the potential correlation between domestic violence, strangulation, and mass homicide using case studies to address examples of repeated behaviors of concern and potential intervention options.

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Free Session: Start by Believing: A Tool for Prevention

Free Session: Start by Believing: A Tool for Prevention

In April 2021, we are celebrating ten years since EVAWI first launched the Start by Believing campaign. Over the past decade, 554 US communities have launched campaigns, seeking to improve the way we respond to sexual and domestic violence, and thousands of people have made the pledge to Start by Believing. Campaigns have been launched in 23 other countries that we know of. During this session, we will discuss the ways in which Start by Believing can be viewed through the lens of prevention and reduce violence across the lifespan. Using stories from survivors, the presenter will share ways that Start by Believing can change justice and healing outcomes. We will also discuss how a positive response, such as believing the survivor, can prevent long-term health and healing consequences such as post traumatic stress disorder, suicide ideation, and autoimmune disease. We will also review preliminary evidence suggesting Start by Believing may have a positive impact on whether victims report or seek help.

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Detection and Visibility of Bruises using Alternate Light: From Science to Practice

Detection and Visibility of Bruises using Alternate Light: From Science to Practice

In this presentation, the presenters will review the science behind alternate light and bruising. They will also present the major findings of a recent National Institute of Justice funded, multi-site, randomized controlled trial comparing alternate light to white light (i.e., normal examination lighting) in the visualization of bruises. The knowledge generated from this study objectively demonstrates that using alternate light improves the detection and visibility of potential bruises, which increases the scientific and evidentiary validity of alternate light findings.

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