Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive


Project Empower: Best Practice in Hospital-based Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Patient Care

Project Empower: Best Practice in Hospital-based Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Patient Care

This session will highlight the development of Project Empower, a hospital-based violence intervention and prevention program, as the result of a 10-year development process. The presenters will describe the initial development, sustainability, and growth of a hospital-based intimate partner violence/domestic violence intervention program at a Level I trauma center.

Speakers:

Only the Faces and Names Change – Witness Intimidation in Intimate Partner Violence Cases

Only the Faces and Names Change – Witness Intimidation in Intimate Partner Violence Cases

Witness intimidation in intimate partner violence cases is a significant problem because offenders use complex interpersonal processes to keep violent relationships intact. Research suggests that as many as 80 percent of cases that reach the court system involve victims that recant or refuse to testify because savvy offenders know how to influence victims. In this environment, what can communities do to improve case outcomes, hold offenders accountable, and ensure victim safety?

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Social Justice Disparities in Utilizing Forensic Nurses – The Innovative Generalist Perspective

Social Justice Disparities in Utilizing Forensic Nurses – The Innovative Generalist Perspective

Forensic nurses have historically been deployed for cases of sexual assault and are under-utilized by law enforcement, advocates, and healthcare settings. As our communities experience even greater numbers of violent crimes, it is essential that forensic nurses are better utilized to care for victim patients and create stronger outcomes. The “generalist perspective” is a paradigm shift designed to eliminate the inequities between victims of violence and assures that all victims of trauma across the lifespan are cared for by skilled, trauma-informed nurses. The generalist model assures care responses that work in urban, rural, and tribal communities with a variety of staffing options.

Speakers:

Transforming Crisis Response into Long-Term Solutions

Transforming Crisis Response into Long-Term Solutions

Barrier Free Living is a domestic violence agency in New York City that serves people with disabilities and those who are D/deaf. According to the World Health Organization, people with disabilities are 1.5 times more likely to be a victim of violence than those without a disability, while those with mental health conditions are at nearly four times the risk of experiencing violence. During the COVID- 19 pandemic we learned a lot about how we can offer services in an accessible and flexible manner. We now better understand the true meaning “client centered” services by letting people choose how they would like to receive services such as by phone, video, or in-person. This resulted in people attending services more regularly and on-time.

Speakers:

The Unreported: How Data Beyond Reported Incidents Can Drive Measurable Change

The Unreported: How Data Beyond Reported Incidents Can Drive Measurable Change

Most domestic violence and sexual assault go unreported. The “National Domestic Violence Prosecution Best Practices Guide” (2017) found that nationwide in the US, 80% of all the cases that were reported, were dismissed largely due to a lack of evidence. We know that victims suffer multiple incidents of domestic violence before they make their first call for help and that they leave and return to an abusive relationship an average of seven times before they leave for good. What we have is a huge void in the actual specifics of what is really taking place in these abusive environments.

Speakers:

Changing the Child Welfare System Response to Domestic Violence – Overview of a Successful Pilot

Changing the Child Welfare System Response to Domestic Violence – Overview of a Successful Pilot

Traditional child welfare approaches to domestic violence place a heavy emphasis on the victim’s actions to protect themselves and their child from the abuser. Many case managers view the act of hiding victims in shelters and then separating them from abusers as a successful resolution to the violence. This approach does not work for many reasons. Relying solely on the victim to stop the violence at best results in the victim being labeled as having a “lack of protective capacity.” At worse, well-meaning case managers increase the danger by forcing a separation without the appropriate safety plan and resources to keep the survivor safe. For decades, this view that separation is the only solution has forced thousands of women to choose between extreme danger, homelessness, or staying with their abuser for lack of other options. Sadly, the result is that they all too frequently lose their children.

Speakers:

Using Film to Raise Awareness of Domestic Violence Featuring Intersectionality with Faith and Race

Using Film to Raise Awareness of Domestic Violence Featuring Intersectionality with Faith and Race

Using art to convey a message is as old as time. But using the art of film to raise awareness of domestic violence (DV) through survivors’ stories is an innovative way to bring this issue out of the shadows and into the light. How we “talk” about DV is important whether through film, news, social media, as advocates, legislation, law enforcement, or community leaders. We must hold ourselves and others accountable to convey authentic language around the issue. Honoring DV survivors with a platform to tell their stories will help better understand their acute challenges.

Speakers:

Measuring Success in the Criminal Justice System’s Response to VAWA Crimes

Measuring Success in the Criminal Justice System’s Response to VAWA Crimes

The presentation will then share the results of a data collection pilot conducted with 15 OVW grantees to explore the usability, feasibility and quality of proposed outcome indicators when collected in the field.

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Using Restorative Justice to Benefit Victim Survivors: Is It Possible?

Using Restorative Justice to Benefit Victim Survivors: Is It Possible?

Although an ancient practice, restorative justice is experiencing a revival in public interest. Communities, particularly those that have been shut out of the traditional American systems of adjudicating crime, are drawn to a system which incorporates community residents into the decision-making process.

Speakers:

Global Panel Discussion: Envisioning Liberty & Justice for All – This World Was made for You & Me

Global Panel Discussion: Envisioning Liberty & Justice for All – This World Was made for You & Me

Blame. Fear of Authority. Lack of Peer Support. Language Barriers. Survivors of assault and domestic violence around the globe are faced with many obstacles as they tirelessly seek justice. Many do not speak up. Those that do seek justice are often misunderstood and blamed for their experiences.

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