Utilizing Technical Evidence in Stalking Investigations and Prosecutions

Get full access to our extensive webinar library at a reduced rate! Sign up now for an individual subscription or invest in your team with agency subscriptions.
Current Status
Not Enrolled
Price
USD$49
Get Started

Duration
90 Minutes

Originally Aired
April 8, 2021

John Wilkinson, JD
Attorney Advisor, AEquitas
Dana Fleitman
Stalking Prevention, Awareness and Resource Center (SPARC) Associate Advisor

More than 7.5 million people in the United States are affected by stalking every year, with some studies indicating that one in four victims report use of technology by the offender. The use of personal computers, mobile devices, and other technology in stalking activity presents challenges for the prosecutor who must connect the activity to the defendant. Prosecutors must be familiar with the sources of available evidence, how to obtain it from technology providers, and how to present it effectively to a jury.

This presentation covers the applicable rules of evidence and relevant case law associated with proving a technology-facilitated stalking case and will provide strategies on when and how to introduce technical evidence and overcome common objections at trial.

Objectives

As a result of this webinar, participants will be better able to:

  • Identify and preserve technical evidence.
  • Identify and overcome evidentiary challenges to admitting technical evidence at trial.
  • Explain the importance of collaboration and coordination with allied professionals to obtain technical evidence.

CONTINUING EDUCATION (NURSES ONLY)

EVAWI is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing to provide Continuing Education contact hours for nurses (Provider #15641).

Registered Nurses may purchase 1.5 contact hours after completing this webinar.


Intellectual Property Rights

Unless otherwise indicated, the content of this webinar is owned or controlled by End Violence Against Women International (EVAWI), and protected by various intellectual property rights and unfair competition laws of the United States, foreign jurisdictions, and international conventions. With a paid registration or subscription, you are free to personally listen to this webinar, as many times as you wish. You may also excerpt or cite the material following accepted conventions. However, you may not allow other individuals to listen to this webinar without a registration or subscription.